the interrogations of shamshouma

Archive for the tag “explosion”

Lebanese suffering on STL stage: narrating violence for the international community


One can criticize many things about the special Tribunal for Lebanon’s, about it being politicized, somewhat meaningless and absurd in the light of the  weekly explosions that have become a matter of mundane occurrences in Lebanon. But what  undeniably interesting about this tribunal is that it offers Lebanese a humanitarian and international  recognition of their suffering by turning them into witnesses of violence.

For the first time in the history of Lebanon, Lebanese (granted, a selected few) are invited to sit and talk in a court of law, whether in person or through video teleconference, to an international and Lebanese audience about their suffering and loss from the 2005 explosion. While acting as witnesses of violence itself, and of their own suffering, the Lebanese are asked questions by both the prosecutor and the defense lawyers. This act of witnessing and narrating suffering invites Lebanese to frame their encounter with violence in an international discourse that (re)defines what it means to be human, what it means to suffer, how to prove your suffering physically and psychologically and how to speak about violence.

Not only that, the Lebanese, for the first time  (Although I vaguely remember a quite similar international “Remy Bandali” moment in the 80s), are getting a taste of what it means to have the international community, our Alma mater,  recognize, register and record, sometimes quite specifically and scientifically, their suffering, for the purpose, we are told, of attaining justice and retribution from violence.

Nazih Abou Rjeily  providing testimony via video teleconference about the death of his brother

Nazih Abou Rjeily providing testimony via video teleconference about the death of his brother in the 2005 explosion in Beirut

By narrating their suffering on the international stage of law, those few and selected Lebanese communicate the most intimate details of the loved ones they lost from the explosion. Whether they suffered unfathomably before they died, how their sudden death affected their family and kins, how long it took for the family to find the body, the types of psychosomatic diseases that afflicted them after their loss, صhow did they broke the news to their parents, how hard it was to grieve for them, etc… Watching one witness after another, I do not feel like I am intruding on their lives or that I am being a peeping shamshoumah, snooping around for dirt about their suffering. Their heartbreaking stories are familiar and close to home.  I listen to their stories and cry sometimes.  I look at them on their international “stage”, sitting between two STL flags, with their headphones on their heads, trying very hard to deliver “the truth” and answering the questions of both lawyers and judges.

These suffering narratives very quickly became quite uncanny. They were both simultaneously familiar and quite disturbing and unfathomable. Suddenly, I feel jealous of their cathartic speech . Why do they get to act out their suffering? I can’t shake this overwhelming feeling of jealousy. I start thinking about the other families from recent explosions, families who lost loved ones during the street fights of 2008, the 2006 war, or the series of explosions that hit Lebanon after the 2005 explosion. I think about the civil war and all the people who lost loved ones, all the injured, the mutilated, the trembling ones, and all the innumerable  horrid stories left untold and unrecognized . I am sure they are jealous too, I think..

It seems to me that in Lebanon, there is this unspoken cultural convention: talking about and narrative your own suffering from violence is not celebrated. It might be tolerated if one is going to admit that “everyone else has suffered as well”. Everyone has suffered in Lebanon because violence, although does not equally hit all social strata, is so entangled in our everyday life, is so constantly anticipated , expected and awaited, that we seem to constantly suffer with each other in silence.

While watching the witnesses talk about their brothers and fathers, and describe their mutilated bodies in the explosion scene, I could not remember how life continued after this explosion, I could not imagine how people picked up the pieces, literally and figuratively, and went on living. I could not remember how we all survived at the edge of life. But then again, we have been doing that for a long time. When the country is on the palm of the demon, its people must remain very very quiet. Their bodies must remain still, they must function the same way everyday. Everything must keep very still so that not to upset the demon. So we keep waking up and going to work, then go back home. We keep walking, taking services, eating, drinking coffee, drinking whiskey and chatting. As if nothing is the matter. We slowly forget previous explosions. there are so many now anyway. We must forget and anticipate  future ones.

it is the smart thing to do, when you’re on the palm of a demon.

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The social exchange of violence and bodies in Lebanon: bomb as routine


Bombs are not shocking in Lebanon. They are only so for the people who were walking from schools, from work or are hanging out in their neighborhood at the time of the explosion.

But it is very clear that “the bomb” has become a regular actor in Lebanese politics, even a shaker of otherwise quite stagnant and unproductive politics. Lebanese politics seem to rely on a thin line, balanced by multiple foreign policies and a local game that turns viciously onto itself  in an endless form of tormented politics. Lebanon is one big chessboard, the only way to move forward is to take down the chess pieces, by a bomb.

Regardless of appalled and shocked statements by politicians and journalists, there is an established and normalized routine of handling, talking about, analyzing and describing the bomb. The bomb is not a destabilizing object, it does not create chaos, emptiness, hysterical outbursts. It only does in the community that hits it, in the neighborhood where it explodes. But who gives a fuck about the community? What the bomb “really” creates is predictable and calculated steps that are very much linked to what the bomb is saying and to whom.

What is the bomb saying? The social exchange of violence

The bomb does not create scattered bodies. It does not kill and create destruction, well maybe for a few minutes on NewTv. The bomb is a message. It is a global and political language exchanged between parties in Lebanon and their foreign sugar daddies. This is why many politicians’ only statements after the explosion were “the message has been received”.

The bomb is not random, it is not traumatizing and destabilizing. It is not an undecipherable ruptured event that disrupts the everyday. It sure did disrupt the hell out of Achrafieh and the neighborhood itself, but again, who gives a fuck? The bomb is a registered linguistic code that transfers political messages on scattered bodies and blood of Lebanese people.

What kind of bomb is this? Asks the NewTv correspondent, as the bodies and remains of people quickly turn into numbers and statistics and are re-appropriated by the bomb to show its strength.

“I am a strong and big bomb” says the bomb.

Bodies, remains, broken glass, people’s everyday walk, neighborhood spirit, cars, shops, people’s lifesaving, old women alone in their apartments, sons and daughters, all these actors are reassembled to be the bomb’s message itself. So they quickly disappear from politics and only the bomb remains.

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